Tag Archives: Landlords

Landlords to receive less tax relief on interest

In a change that will impact residential landlords, the amount of income tax relief available on residential property finance costs will be restricted to the basic rate of income tax. This change will mean that landlords will no longer be able to deduct all of their finance costs from their property income. They will instead receive a basic rate reduction from their income tax liability for their finance costs.

The restriction in the relief will be phased in over a four year period as follows:

  • in 2017/18, the deduction from property income will be restricted to 75% of finance costs, with the remaining 25% being available as a basic rate tax reduction;
  • in 2018/19, 50% finance costs deduction and 50% given as a basic rate tax reduction;
  • in 2019/20, 25% finance costs deduction and 75% given as a basic rate tax reduction;
  • from 2020/21, all financing costs incurred by a landlord will be given as a basic rate tax reduction.

These rules do not apply to residential properties held in companies.

In addition rules may further restrict the relief which is due where the individual’s property income or total income is less than the amount on which basic rate relief is due. The computation is complex so please do get in touch if you would like us to review your position.

Internet link: GOV.UK guidance

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Changes for ‘Buy to Let’ landlords in Summer Budget

t was announced in the Summer 2015 Budget that the government will restrict the amount of income tax relief landlords can claim on residential property mortgage interest costs to the basic rate of income tax.

This means that residential landlords will no longer be able to deduct all of their finance costs from their property income. Tax relief will instead be restricted to the basic rate. To ease the impact the government will introduce this change gradually from April 2017, over four years.

This restriction will not apply to landlords of furnished holiday lettings. The mechanics of the restricted relief will mean that some taxpayers who are currently only liable at the basic rate will be subject to higher rate tax, and could result in some losing the benefit of their personal allowance.

Additionally, from April 2016 the government will replace the Wear and Tear Allowance with a new relief that allows all residential landlords to deduct the actual costs of replacing furnishings. This will bring relief back onto similar footing to that permitted prior to April 2013, with tax relief following actual expenditure.

For more information contact Peter Kennan at pjk@hawsons.co.uk.